The oil business is a chicken and Feathers Business.

A chicken and feathers business.
Remember this! This really is a chicken and feathers business!.
Texas Independent Oil Operators have had a prolonged diet of feathers.
It is time to eat chicken again!
Untill the feathers come back.

Forrest Walker, Oil Operator

Forrest Walker, Oil Operator
1899-1951

WHAT DOES  THIS PICTURE HAVE TO DO WITH  STRIPPER-MARGINAL OIL WELLS?
The picture is of Forrest Walker. The picture was taken in 1937. In 1932 he started in the oil business in East Texas buying and selling mineral leases. 

He and a lot of oil men like him worked in an era that new discoveries were being made.
They were learning about new fields and the characteristics of those fields
Lots of production was passed by at seventy five cent per barrel of oil!
Lots of gas was torched at eight cents per thousand cubic ft.

Here is the moral to the story:
It is not necessarily what you do in life . It's when you do it!
             People owned mineral rights that were considered of no value in years past.
18,000 ft gas was absurd.
           Technology changed that. Technology is changing the recovery
of oil in Stripper wells.   

   66 percent of the discovered oil is still in place and it does have a value.
That value will increase. 
Fiat Money is of little value today. Just electronic impulses on a computer chip!

A glance into the past::

Things were tough in Alabama in 1930.

J. Curtis Sanford (web) left Birmingham and came to East Texas. 

Mr. Sanford started making money in the East Texas oil field. He suggested to Forrest Walker
to do the same.

Forrest worked around Tyler, Longview, Kilgore in the early 30's. Later in the Hawkins Field. 

A business associate was Summerfield G. Roberts among others. I  know that he did a lot of business with Al Meadows,
General American Oil Co. (web)

Most of his friends and associates were in the oil business.     

Forrest made sizeable money in his short life. 1937, 1941 and 1946 were very good years. 1946 was when Al Meadows- General American, sold his Hawkins Field interests.

Forrest Walker died early at  51 years of age. 

Mr. Meadows attended his funeral along with others whom we think of today as pioneers of the East Texas oil boom.

THE PICTURE ON THE LEFT WAS  HIS TRANSPORTATION IN 1937. A fine luxury
automobile of the day.

THE  PICTURE BELOW WAS HIS  TRANSPORTATION IN 1939. Street Cars were the mode of transport for Forrest Walker and  not necessarily by choice.

A persons other choice was walking.

1937 Lincoln Zepher Autmobile
Street Car, Dallas, Texas, 1940

1937 Lincoln Automobile

A Street Car.

The Texas oil business has always run in cycles.

Page 15

Money In Oil, Tyler, Texas